June 2, 2017

a guest post by Ty Arthur, author of "Light Dawning"

Following his debut sci-fi novella “Empty” from 2016, Ty Arthur returns with new full-length horror novel “Light Dawning.” Pivoting away from the emptiness of space, the book dives headlong into the waters of fantasy, but with a seriously grimdark twist. This next foray into the bleaker corners of human existence is officially slated for release on Friday, May 26th, 2017. Kindle pre-orders are now online at https://www.amazon.com/Light-Dawning-Ty-Arthur-ebook/dp/B0722FJ3ZB/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8 




a guest post by Ty Arthur

After short stories set on modern day Earth and a far future space novella, for Light Dawning I wanted to shift focus yet again to a different style. Even though its absolutely a horror story, this time around I wanted to explore a fantasy world.


The fantasy genre doesn't need another epic tale where a rag tag group of unexpected heroes rises to the occasion and defeats the dark lord after discovering the magical MacGuffin. There's already enough of those. Likewise, there's already enough epics with dwarves mining for gold in their mountain homes and graceful, pointy eared elves living in tree cities. It was clear when I started writing Light Dawning that high fantasy wouldn't be a viable option for the kind of story being told.


Fantasy as a genre is a form of wish fulfillment – its right there in the name. The genre offers a glimpse of the sort of world people wish existed rather than the one that actually does. It provides the escapism of noble men and women standing fast against the tide of evil no matter the odds, of the powerful using their resources in the name of good, and of people being celebrated for breaking the rules if it they do it for the right reasons.

Who knows, maybe one day grimdark will become the equivalent of the zombie novel, with review sites having to list a disclaimer that “no, yours isn't different from all the others, please don't submit,” but for now, its a genre full of possibilities still to be explored. Light Dawning and the tale of Cestia's final hours is just the beginning of my exploration of this style, as there's no shortage of grim material to mine from the real world to transplant into a fantasy setting.








“Grimdark” then is the injection of unpleasant reality into that fantasy. Going even further than low fantasy, where the focus is primarily on humans and the things they do, grimdark reminds the audience that all is not well in the world, and that the addition of elements like magic and gods wouldn't actually make the world any better.


Fantasy is a genre ripe with possibilities for horror that aren't utilized nearly often enough. When I think of what people in the real world would do if supernatural abilities suddenly became available, the first scenarios that come to mind most definitely aren't “feed the hungry” or “provide housing for the poor” or “set the wrongfully convicted free.” There's no question that magic – were it to exist on Earth – would be used for war and enforcing religious dominance and keeping the elite wealthy few at the top of the proverbial totem pole.


With Light Dawning I've gone a step further even, with the supernatural abilities wielded by a handful of characters in this book all rooted in a cosmic horror source. Not only are they not being used for altruistic reasons, they come with the danger of insanity and extremely unexpected consequences. Magic is more a curse than a gift here, and those who choose to wield it will frequently wish that they hadn't.


Reversing all the standard fantasy tropes was a strong impetus while writing this book, and that included the priests and pantheons so typical of the style. The clergy in this book's universe are quite incorrect in assuming the gods they worship actually care about them, or that these infinite beings who entirely embody some cosmic principle would even have comprehensible desires.


After all, what does the sun really want? Who can say that they truly understand the goals of the darkness in the night sky, even if it even has goals at all? Any human desires attributed to these beings are more a reflection of the character bestowing them than on the actual “god” itself. Does a star have an opinion on how the planets orbiting closest to it are burned to a crisp while those farther away might be in just the right spot for life to flourish?


With no altruistic priests or heroes to rescue them from an invading army, the focus on Light Dawning shifts from whether the characters will save the world, but to whether its even worth saving and how people will deal with harsh reality. How do the people of Cestia respond when their gods utterly fail to save them from invasion and do nothing to ease their suffering in the intervening years? At what point does survival in a brutal occupation become less trouble than its worth? When death is all around, what will these characters make of their final days and how important are their decisions?


AUTHOR BIO
Ty Arthur gets to meld his passions with his work while freelancing for the likes of Metalunderground.com and GameSkinny. His debut sci-fi / horror novella “Empty” was released in early 2016, with many more dark tales still to come. Arthur writes to exorcise his demons and lives in the cold, dark north with his amazing wife Megan and infant son Gannicus Picard.

LINKS
Amazon author page: https://www.amazon.com/Ty-Arthur/e/B0727MRVF8
Official website: https://tyarthur.wordpress.com/
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/12585427.Ty_Arthur
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ty.g.arthur

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