October 17, 2014

Crude Awakening: an interview with Rex Burns, author of "Crude Carrier"

Rex Burns (b. 1935) is the author of numerous thrillers set in and around Denver, Colorado. His Edgar Award–winning first novel, The Alvarez Journal (1975), introduced Gabe Wager, a Denver police detective working in an organized crime unit. (http://www.openroadmedia.com/rex-burns)

About Crude Carrier: When a sailor dies under unusual circumstances, Raiford goes undercover on the high seas

The Rossi family received only a handful of letters after their son shipped out on the supertanker Aurora Victorious. The first dispatches were from Harold himself, describing the blend of tedium and excitement that defined life onboard the ship. The last communication came from the ship’s owners: four brief sentences informing them that their son had died and been buried at sea. Desperate to know more, the Rossis turn to James and Julie Raiford, the father-daughter detective team behind the Touchstone Agency. As the Raifords soon learn, work on the open sea is dangerous—and asking questions can be deadly.

When the shipping company stonewalls the investigation, James joins the Aurora Victorious as an electronics officer, and Julie digs into the proprietors’ shadowy background. International oil shipping is a ruthless business, and its secrets run as deep as the ocean itself.


(http://www.openroadmedia.com/crude-carrier)


Gef: In Body Slam, the first in this series, a childhood fascination of yours was included in the story, that being professional wrestling. With Crude Carrier, I assume it's your familiarity with working on ships that you draw upon? 

Rex: The only real work I did aboard ship was as a mess officer on the troopship Daniel I. Sultan (San Diego to Naha, Okinawa), and as the embarkation officer for a group of Landing Ship Tanks (LST's) ferrying a Marine tank battalion (Naha to Numazu, Japan, and return). Those chores did, indeed, give me a sense of the operational aspects and personnel relationships of shipboard life. In addition, as a child ("navy junior") I did have voyages short and long on both military and civilian ships. Before WWII, it was San Francisco to Manila aboard a Presidential Line ship (I don't remember the return voyage). Following WWII, the Navy was generous about allowing dependents aboard ships to enhance morale and, basically, to show off the vessels that had conquered the Japanese navy (at great cost). Latterly, there have been a couple vacation cruise tours. But the early "cruises" were far more helpful for Crude Carrier's setting than was the occasional holiday tour. The passage of time—like wind blowing sand from around rocks—has eroded all but the most indelible memories of the feel of a living ship, the brine smell and color of deep water, the ocean sky, the sense of being in a contained vessel on a vacant horizon.

Gef: Crude Carrier and the Touchstone Agency series isn't exactly your first rodeo. When you go into a new series, is there an aspect to that is daunting, giving up what you might consider a tried-and-true series to forge new ground with new characters? 

Rex: There is some challenge, of course, but the sense of novelty in sketching new characters and the opportunities of new settings offers plenty of compensation for the additional effort. The "Gabe Wager" series was restricted to Colorado in general and Denver in particular. This was very good for developing local color, and it allowed me to document the life and times of the city over the span of a dozen titles, which was one of my principal aims. But more and more, I wanted to move beyond the jurisdiction of my policeman. The result was a private eye series whose protagonists were based in Denver but free to go anywhere the story led. This "Devlin Kirk" series was brief—the sales didn't encourage a publisher to bring out more than three titles, and it's hard to maintain enthusiasm for work that may never be published. Plus, the vicissitudes of my personal life overwhelmed my publishing career at the same time. But writers write, and I've been fortunate that Mysterious Press/Open Road have enabled the publication of the "Touchstone Associates" series which offers the world to for the characters to explore. 

Gef: Was the research for this novel particularly intensive? Also, where in the process of writing does the research come into play for you? Are you getting the story down first or pouring over material beforehand and shaping the story around that? 

Rex: I don't know that the research for "Crude Carrier" was more intensive than that for my other tales—one of the satisfactions of the kind of writing I do is to place a protagonist in a setting or occupation that I would like to know more about (e.g., small-town rodeo: "Ground Money", or professional wrestling: "Body Slam"). It's fun to dig into the occupations that focus the lives of people, and to learn a little about the challenges and rewards of various endeavors. The juggling act for the writer is to present a believable—and reasonably accurate—portrayal of each occupation without slowing the story and boring the reader.

As for the process of research, it's more a continuum than a block of time. The idea of a story has to be tested against any innate interest an occupation or setting might have to see if there's enough to be curious about. If there's not and I find myself being bored with the setting or occupation, the odds are the reader will be bored too. But if, as usually happens, there's something there that catches one's curiosity, then the research keeps pace with the story. Fortunately, the computer has made it so much easier to look something up when the story needs it. And I find myself, like so many other browsers, spending a lot of time discovering little known facts about nothing that have no bearing on the story at hand—but which might lead to something later.

Gef: Being out on a ship for any great length, I imagine the thing works as its own little ecosystem floating atop the high seas. Is there a particular misconception among the public as it relates to that line of work, whether it be long haul or something more military in nature? 

Rex: Living in Colorado as I do, I should be surrounded by misconceptions about shipboard life—but being so far from any ocean, ships and sailors don't often become topics of conversation. Perhaps the salient misconception I've found in reading about seamanship is the idea that seafaring is a lonely life. However, my limited knowledge of those who go down to the sea in ships is that many, if not most, sailors prefer being aboard and away to being stuck on shore. The ocean looks different each day, though those differences are usually subtle; and there's always the next port to look forward to. You're constantly moving toward something, and the noon chit tells the crew what they accomplished in the last 24 hours. It does not surprise me that so many Navy sailors come from smaller towns in the middle of the country. 

Gef: You strike me as the type of writer that likes to keep things lean and firing on all cylinders when it comes to your novels. When you're writing is story length a big consideration for you or do you tend to let the water find its own level, so to speak? 

Rex: For me, the length of the work is decided at the beginning since the opening lines have a different feel for a short story than do those of a novel. There's more "space" when starting a long form, and the characters and conflicts don't have to develop quite as fast (or be pushed aside) as in a short form. In the "Constable Leonard Smith" short stories, for example, the reader gets a little of the protagonist's history in each story—often none, if the plot doesn't require it. There's just very little room in 3000-5000 words to fill out such a history. A novella, however, is a bit different, and, for me, much harder to write because of its additional length. One has to combine the quick movement and tight focus of the short story, with the wider canvas and complexity of character(s) of a novel. 

Gef: What would be the one piece of writing advice you are sick and tired of hearing get passed around? 

Rex: The one piece of writing advice that I'm sick and tired of hearing is "write what you know." I would advise "write what you're interested in knowing." 

Gef: When it comes to guilty pleasures, are there any books you've enjoyed that would fit the bill? 

Rex: I really can't think of any book that I've read with pleasure that has also generated a sense of guilt. If it's fun to read, hey! Enjoy! Usually, if I find no pleasure in the reading, I find no interest in the book and don't read it. The pleasures of reading a story—thematic, stylistic, subject, or any other appeal—are enough to justify guiltless reading. There are also those novels that one dislikes on first try, but grows up enough to read later in life. Any "guilt" generated by that experience comes from not having found pleasure in the first reading (Proust, for me). I have struggled with some books that I've had to read for classes or because someone wanted an evaluation. But even that kind of effort, while without either guilt or pleasure, can give insight into why something in the story-telling isn't working—i.e., they offer the opportunity to learn from the mistakes of others rather than from one's own mistakes. 

Gef: What can readers expect next from you? 

Rex: I do like swash-buckling pirate yarns (no guilt, just pleasure) and historical novels, and would like to publish in those genres. We'll see ...

October 15, 2014

Chasing Tale [10/15/14]: Jolly Olde Censorship

Chasing Tale is a recurring highlight of the most recent books to wind up on my bookshelves, as well as a rant about whatever is on my mind.


A few days ago an article popped up on The Guardian. Long story short, a British man wrote a book highlighting his childhood experiences of sexual abuse. It was set to be published, but his ex-wife hired a lawyer who successfully got an injunction on the book's publication. You might be wondering on what grounds could such a thing happen, as I was since the book isn't about the ex-wife. Well, they have a young son and the ex-wife claims that the subject matter could traumatize the boy if he ever read the book.

Keep in mind that this is not a children's book. This is essentially a memoir, which I'm pretty sure is not the kind of book in high demand among children. I could be wrong, but unless this bleak subject matter is accompanied by some very macabre pop-up pages, I can't imagine the man's son, or any other child for that matter, would give an iota of a crap about reading it. But that reasoning was enough to literally stop the presses.

And on top of the rather insane ruling is the even more insane manner by which the British courts have rendered the entire case in secrecy:

The details of the case are shrouded in such extensive secrecy that the artist can be identified only as MLA, his exact form of performance cannot be described and his publishers can be named only as STL. His son, whose age cannot be published – other than to say that he is “approaching his teenage years” – can be named only as OPO. The boy’s mother can be identified only as BHM.
All this because a boy might--not will, only might--read a book.

Well, for god's sake, don't let that kid anywhere near these books either, if that's the case:



Factory Town by Jon Bassoff - Jon's second novel with DarkFuse keeps up the super cheery atmosphere--oh wait, did I say super cheery? I meant oppressively bleak. Yeah, because I don't think there are many musical numbers in the apocalyptic ghost town in which this book is set.

The Family Tree by John Everson - John's latest novel is out via Samhain Horror with a deliciously evil cover and a story involving what I think is some kind of demonic moonshine. Anyone else feeling thirsty?

Sleepy Hollow High: Horseman by Christopher Golden - Speaking of quadrilogy, here is the first book in Christopher's urban fantasy series. I think all four books are sold as an omnibus, too.


Santa's Little Helper by H.D. Gordon - This one is up for pre-order right now, set for release on Halloween. Just in time to get you in the Christmas spirit ... sort of. You can check out her guest post from a couple day ago too, if you're curious to learn more about the book (just click here).

Raiju: A Kaiju Hunter Novel by K.H. Koehler - Kaiju! It's just a banner year for giant monsters, I suppose. Last I saw on Monday, this novel was still free on the Kindle Store too, so you might snag yourself a cheapie if you're quick.

White Knight by Bracken MacLeod - An idealistic attorney finds himself in a last ditch effort to save a young boy and his mother from an abusive monster. This novella from One Eye Press has been on my radar for a while now and I finally decided to add it to my Kindle.

October 13, 2014

He Knows When You Are Sleeping: a guest post by H.D. Gordon, author of "Santa's Little Helper"





HE KNOWS WHEN YOU ARE SLEEPING…
a guest post by H. D. Gordon




Let’s be honest, the whole idea of that Elf on the Shelf is just creepy. My friend sent me one for my daughters a year ago, but I remember the moment I received it as if it were yesterday.



I was cutting open the box the thing came in, when my phone rang. It was my friend; the one who’d sent the box.



“Did you get it?” she asked, upon my answering.



“Um, yeah, I got it.” I said, pulling the book and the elf doll out of the box. “It’s…cute,” I lied.



My friend laughed. “Read the book to the girls. It tells the story of how the elf was sent there by Santa, to watch over them until Christmas,” she said. “I’ve heard so many parents say that it really gives incentive for kids to behave, because you’re supposed to wait until the kids are asleep, and then sneak into the room and move the elf to a different spot in the house, that way the girls will think it’s flying back to the North Pole every night to report to Santa.” She paused. “Cute, right?”



My lips curled involuntarily as I took in the wide grin on the elf’s plastic face. “Adorable,” I said.



“It’s really popular with children,” she continued. “I think the girls will like it.”



I think I would have buried this thing in the backyard were it given to me as a child, I thought.



“I’m sure they will,” I said.



This answer pleased my friend. My daughters, however–apples from my own tree that they are–were not pleased. We ended up throwing the elf doll away, at my daughters’ adamant request. I didn’t tell my friend this.



Being that I am a writer, with a healthy interest in the macabre, naturally, a story was born of this little episode. That story is called SANTA’S LITTLE HELPER, and it is scheduled to be released on amazon on 10/31/14, but you can pre-order it now for $2.99.



So, if you were one of those children who kept your limbs carefully tucked in, so as not to dangle over the edge of the bed, where any number of unimaginable creatures could take hold, and yank you into the darkness, this book is for you. All those terrors your imagination coughed up as you laid swallowed in shadows, are between the pages.



But, be warned, you might end up throwing out your child’s precious Elf on the Shelf by the end of SANTA’S LITTLE HELPER.



And if you’d like to read a sneak peak of Santa’s Little Helper, you can visit hdgordonbooks.com, and go to my blog page to download the first four chapters.



Thank you so much to my gracious hosts, for letting me post here.


Happy Halloween, everyone!


H. D. Gordon is the bestselling author of THE ALEXA MONTGOMERY SAGA, THE JOE KNOWE SERIES, and THE SURAH STORMSONG NOVELS. She is a lifelong reader and writer, a true lover of words. When she is not reading and writing, she is busy raising her two daughters and keeping the world’s zombie population under control.









October 11, 2014

Some Things Don't Stay Buried: a review of Barry Napier's "Snow Angels"

Snow Angels
by Barry Napier
published in 2014
105 pages
ASIN: B00NT6700A

How far down can one man fall? For Winn, it's pretty damn far. Alcoholism has ravaged his existence ever since his son died. He lost his job at the lumberyard, now making ends meet with what work he can find cutting wood, the house where he had started his family is gone and replaced by a rundown shack, and his wife while still living with him has been cheating on him fairly regularly. The three years have taken a toll, but not near as much as when a stranger calls one morning to say he's abducted his wife and demands Winn bring his dead boy, Kevin, to him.

That'd sober any man up, I reckon.

Barry's latest novella takes a more low-key tone, more subtle tone, than the previous works of his that I've read. The tension is immediate, no denying that, but it's not a mike-a-minute, cat-and-mouse chase here. Winn is as much trapped by his own demons as the one tormenting him and his wife, and the guilt coupled with the helplessness, as he realizes he is even more out of his depth than he first thought, does a big number on his head.

It starts off quite grounded, but as Winn strikes out to find his wife and the man who has her, things becomes more skewed for him. He doesn't trust others to help him, and he soon learns there might be good reason for that, along with the possibility that they couldn't really help him if he wanted them to.

Barry Napier has been steadily building upon his work, dipping into different genres, but it always seems to be that these darkly tinged tales of down-on-their-luck characters facing insurmountably and potentially supernatural threats are where his work really shines. It's bleak, but borderline great.

October 9, 2014

October is “Vampire Books for Blood” Month!: a guest post by Scott Burtness, author of "Wisconsin Vamp"


October is “Vampire Books for Blood” Month!
A guest post by “Wisconsin Vamp” author Scott Burtness


Poor vampires. Always getting a bad rap for taking blood but never giving back. I’d like to help polish the tarnished image of those poor soulless souls by making this October “Vampire Books for Blood Month!”

I am bringing together authors from across the country to support the American Red Cross. Participating authors are pledging to donate up to 100% of their net royalties from October book sales to the Red Cross Blood services of their choice. To kick-off the event, I’ve pledged to donate 100% of my net royalties from sales of my horror-comedy novel “Wisconsin Vamp” to the Red Cross North Central Blood Services. I’m also hosting a raffle on Goodreads. Three winners will receive a signed copy of “Wisconsin Vamp,” a Wisconsin-themed postcard from the main character, Herb, and a t-shirt and gift bag from the Red Cross North Central Blood Services.

The event has a Facebook page where participating authors will post their book(s) and the percentage of their royalties they will donate. Visit the page often during the month of October, as new authors will be continually signing up. Every book you purchase will support the Red Cross.

Why am I doing this? Well, as I mentioned above, vampires get a bad rap and many would love a chance to give back to the community. More importantly, blood products are perishable and the need is constant to help prevent a shortage and ensure an adequate blood supply for patients. Red blood cells have a shelf life of only 42 days and platelets just five days, so they must be replenished constantly – there is no substitute. The American Red Cross supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood. On average, they must collect 15,000 blood donations every day for patients at about 2,700 hospital and transfusion centers across the country. Also, the Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disaster, teaches skills that save lives, provides humanitarian aid, and supports military members and their families.

The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. The money raised during “Vampire Books for Blood” month will help support their blood drives, disaster relief efforts and other great services.

If you are looking for a new vampire or horror novel this Halloween season, I hope you’ll visit the “Vampire Books for Blood” Facebook page, share it with your friends, and follow the fun on Twitter (#VampBooks4Blood). It may only be one month, but the difference we make will last a lifetime!

Vampire Books for Blood on Facebook:

On Twitter: #VampBooks4Blood

The American Red Cross Northern Minnesota Region*:

The American Red Cross name and emblem are used with its permission, which in no way constitutes an endorsement, express or implied, of any product, service, company, opinion or political position. The American Red Cross logo is a registered trademark owned by the American Red Cross. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org.

October 8, 2014

Chasing Tale [10/8/14]: Awards! Huh, Yeah! What Are They Good For?

Chasing Tale is a recurring highlight of the most recent books to wind up on my bookshelves, as well as a rant about whatever is on my mind.

I see this morning that the shortlists for Canada's Giller Prize and Governor General's Literary Awards have been announced. We're just a couple months removed from the Hugo Awards, the World Fantasy Awards are about a month away, and horror hounds are gearing up for the nomination process of the Bram Stoker Awards. Everywhere you turn, there is some kind of chatter about books awards.

The thing I wonder is whether all this chatter is resonating with readers as much as it is with writers. I dig the award seasons for two reasons:

1) When it comes the literary awards, it is the one time of year when mainstream media seems to even acknowledge the existence of books. The rest of the year, books basically get mentioned whenever there are movies based on books.

2) Award ballots and shortlists are one of the ways I get book recommendations. It's not the only way, not even the most influential way, but they serve as a way to talk with fellow writers and readers to see what books we're reading, what books we're anticipating to read, and what books we are stymied as to how they could be considered as deserving any kind of award.

As far as campaigning and politicking and the embittered authors fuming on social media ... well, that's just a delightfully entertaining side-effect. The kerfuffle that was the "sad puppy" campaign leading up the Hugo Awards was certainly sad, but not in the way it was intended. And when it comes to the Stoker Awards, they never disappoint in supplying at least one disgruntled rant from a jilted author or cynical spectator. For all the awards do to shine a light on the best books of the year, they also offer a chance to see the writing community's worst nature.

At the end of the day though, I just want some book recommendations. How about you? What do these book awards mean to you?

Oh, and speaking of books, some more were added to my to-be-read pile. Take a look:




Defender of the Innocent by Lawrence Block - A collection of clever mystery tales involving a lawyer who prefers to do his job outside the court room as much as possible.

Warm and Willing by Lawrence Block - I believe this might be the first erotic novel Lawrence Block ever had published, now re-released under his own name with Emily Beresford narrating.


Owl and the Japanese Circus by Kristi Charish - This showed up on my doorstep last week from Simon & Schuster Canada. It looks like an urban fantasy with a January 2015 release.

Crossover by John C. Dalglish - John is taking a little break from his Jason Strong series to kick off a new series called The Chaser.



Hawthorne: Tales of a Weirder West by Heath Lowrance - One man against evil? Set in the wild west? Sign me up.

Crossroads by Kelli Owen - Squee. A novella from Kelli was offered up for free the other day on the Kindle Store, and just in time for Halloween too. Teens in the woods with a Ouija board? Oh yeah, bring it on.

Grave Men by Tom Piccirilli - I don't recall ever reading one of Tom Piccirilli's westerns. Well, I got one off the Kindle Store, so that's half the battle right there.


Short Ride to Nowhere by Tom Piccirilli - I also bought this tempting little novella last week too, because ... well, it's Tom Piccirilli, man.

Dying for a Living by Kory M. Shrum - I won a copy of this audiobook from Kory last week, which looks to be a cool-sounding urban fantasy.


A Beautiful Madness by Lee Thompson - Lee was kind enough to send a signed copy of his Texas thriller the other day. *fist pump*

Dead On Writing by Robert W. Walker - Here's an audiobook I received that's actually a nonfiction title dedicated to the craft of writing. This should be an interesting listening experience.


Scavenger Part 2: Blue Dawn by Timothy C. Ward - This is the second offering in Tim's Scavenger series set in Hugh Howey's Sand universe. He did a pretty darned good job with the first story, so I'm curious to see how the second turns out.

October 6, 2014

Nora Bonesteel: a guest post and giveaway with Sharyn McCrumb, author of "Nora Bonesteel's Christmas Past"

If you would like a chance to win a copy of this brand new title from Sharyn and Abingdon Press, just leave a comment with a way to contact you if your name is randomly drawn on Friday morning, October 10th. To find out a little more about the book, just keep reading. Enjoy!

When someone buys the old Honeycutt house, Nora Bonesteel is glad to see some life brought back to the old mansion, even if it is by summer people. But when the new owners decide to stay in their summer home through Christmas, they find more than old memories in the walls.  Nora agrees to help sort things out, and is drawn into a time and place she never expected to revisit.

Meanwhile, Sheriff Spencer Arrowood and Deputy Joe LeDonne find themselves on an unwelcome call on Christmas Eve to arrest an elderly man for a minor offense. As the officers attempt to do their duty, it begins to look like they may spend Christmas away from home.

In a story of Christmas, spirits, memories and angels unaware, New York Times best-selling author Sharyn McCrumb revisits the mountains and the characters of her beloved Ballad novels.



Between the pages of the novels we adore, we meet characters we love and some we love to hate. We recognize their kindness, compassion, stubbornness, and tenacity. We love that they have the courage we don’t, the patience we lack, the humor we desperately want. For better or worse, we relate—or want to relate. And when that last page turns, we miss them. They stick with us, and yet they have been silenced. Until now. What if we can revisit with these characters that have captivated our minds and stolen our hearts? What if we could hear more from…
Nora BonesteelinNora Bonesteel’s Christmas Past

This necklace? Why, I’ve worn this little stone cross for nearly as long as I can remember. The string of beads it’s on is new, though. My neighbor Charlotte Pentland made it for me, back when she was studying geology at East Tennessee State. She was most particular about telling me what stones she used to make it. The dark mottled green beads are serpentine, her favorite stone. Mountain DNA, she calls it. Charlotte says that a long time ago—before the Atlantic Ocean existed, in fact—these mountains of ours were connected to the mountains in Scotland, Ireland, and Wales. She says that a vein of this serpentine mineral snakes its way all along the path of the mountains, breaking off at the northern end of New Brunswick, Canada and picking up again in the mountains of Ireland—they’re all the same mountains. Our frontier ancestors didn’t know that, but when they settled here, they were right back in the same mountains they had just left.
The lighter green stones with a dash of pink in them are Unakite, because they come from these Unaka Mountains, where I live. People call Unakite the seer’s stone, because they say it helps you attain the Sight. I didn’t need any help there, but they are pretty little stones, so I let her put them on, too.
The pendant, a little stone cross was given to me when I was a child, the time I went wandering out alone on the mountain and got lost. I wasn’t too afraid at first, because it was summer and the weather was good, but when suppertime came and went, and twilight came, I sat down on a rock at the bottom of a steep ridge, and began to cry. A little while later, I realized I wasn’t alone. Beside me stood a stranger—a small, dark-haired woman, wearing a deer skin dress and moccasins. Her skin had a coppery glow, and she was smiling at me, to let me know I needn’t be afraid.
“Are you lost, child?”
“Yes’m,” I said. “I must have got turned around somehow. I can’t figure out which way is home.”
She nodded. “Well, I suppose I could set you on the right path, child—unless you’d rather come with me.” She pointed to a vine-covered opening in the embankment that I hadn’t seen before. “Through that cave there.”
“You live in a cave?’
“Not in the cave, but through it. On the other side, you will find a beautiful land where it is always summer, and the tomatoes and corn are always ripe and good. Where I live, no one ever gets sick and no one ever grows old. Would you like to come and live there?”
I shook my head. “My grandmother will be worrying about me. I need to go home.”
She nodded. “Perhaps that would be best. Follow me and I’ll take you back to the edge of the woods by your farm. But take this.” She reached into her pocket and took out this little stone cross. She pressed it into the palm of my hand. “You are young yet, child, but someday… someday if you find that your bones ache, and you can’t see to thread your needle, and you dread the coming of the winter cold, then you hold that cross in your hand, and call for me. I’ll come to you, and we’ll see what choice you make then.”
I’ve kept this little cross ever since that day, and now that so many years have gone by, I understand what she meant. I may see her again someday, but not for a while yet. Not for a while.




Sharyn McCrumb is author of The Rosewood Casket, The Ballad of Tom Dooley, and many other acclaimed novels.  Her much-loved “Ballad” novels weave together the legends, natural wonders, and contemporary issues of Appalachia. Readers have come to love the characters, mountains, and mystery brought to life by the award-winning southern writer. Nora Bonesteel’s Christmas Past is her first-ever holiday novel.


http://www.noraisback.com/


October 3, 2014

Chinatown v2.0: a review of Milo James Fowler's "Girl of Great Price"

Girl of Great Price
by Milo James Fowler
40 pages
published in 2014
originally publishing in Girl Trouble anthology (2013)
ASIN B00MT6H70E

I remember reading a couple great reviews for the Malfeasance Occasional anthology, Girl Trouble, last year. But it slipped off the radar shortly thereafter and I didn't really give it a second thought. If the story are as good as this novelette from Milo James Fowler, I may have to put it back on my watch list, because this was right up my alley.

A world-weary private-eye, living a world now divided in two after a great near-future war has ravaged the planet, winds up on a case in search of a veterans abducted adopted-daughter. Working a case it hard enough, because the Russian mob pretty much runs most of the city. It doesn't help when the kingpin has some cybernetic goons doing his dirty work while keeping his own identity tightly guarded. And much like the private eyes of noir's yesteryear, Charlie Madison takes a lickin' while doling out his own brand of investigative brutality as well.

In quick fashion, the world is fleshed out, the stakes set and raised, and Charlie Madison regarded as a cynical hero in a world of villains. I dug it and would have no objections to a novel-length Madison mystery brought out down the line. As it stands, genre-blending fans should find a fun, fast read here that'll whet the appetite for more.

October 2, 2014

Trailer for "The Rage Vol. 1: Zombie Generation" by Pierre Boisserie and Malo Kerfriden

This coming Tuesday sees the release of a new graphic novel from Titan Comics, and for zombie lovers it could be just the thing you've been waiting for if The Walking Dead has worn out its welcome.

Titan Comics released a book trailer on YouTube this week and the book looks pretty wild. I mean, zombie kids! Kids can be creepy enough in horror, but turning them all into brain-munching zombies just ... blech ... full body shiver, right there.

Take a look at the trailer and tell me what you think.




THE RAGE VOL. 1: ZOMBIE GENERATION
Writer: Pierre BoisserieArtist: Malo Kerfriden 48pp - 8 X 11 - HC - FC - $9.99 - On Sale: October 7

A new pandemic virus, a mutated form of rabies, spreads throughout the world. It affects only children, turning them into mindless, violent killers, hungry for blood.

Now humanity faces an impossible choice: kill every child – or face extinction… The government tries to save those infected by keeping them locked away until a treatment becomes possible.

The government men find protecting the children more and more difficult, however, for large militia groups now roam the land – with a single-minded purpose: to kill all the infected, and cleanse the world of the virus. Meet Amina; a young mother battling to save her son – but she finds not only their lives hanging in the balance, but her humanity, and that of everyone around her, too.

The Rage Vol. 1: Zombie Generation is on sale from Oct 7 2014. 

September 30, 2014

Infernal Inspirations: a guest post by G.R. Wilson, author of "Right Behind You"

Hello literary world! My name is G.R. Wilson, and I try to minimize how much I write about myself in third person. I'm a relatively new author: I used to write short stories frequently in elementary school, and then for whatever reason just sort of stopped as I got older. In college a couple years ago I started again, and ended up publishing my first book, Right Behind You: Tales of the Spooky and Strange in Fall 2013. This month, my short story The Tale of Patchy Jack was featured in Michael K. Silva's The Nightmare Engine, Issue 7.

Right Behind You is a scary story anthology, and I wrote with the Young Adult demographic (around ages 13 and up) in mind, though I venture that people much older than that enjoy it. My goal was to write some stories that would be good for campfire reading, some better suited to solitary late-night reading, and some suited for both.

In my Horror writing, (and Horror is my specialty genre for right now,) I'm inspired by many things: my own dreads and phobias, ghost stories I heard as a kid, history, technology. I'm confident that this wide range of inspiration shows in my book, where the stories feature everything from a Borg-like, hive-mind computer, to Lovecraftian tentacle beasts, to deranged doctors, to a wereskunk. And, good old-fashioned traditional ghosts, too.

The way I wrote Right Behind You was this: a couple years ago as I said, when I began writing again after a decade long hiatus, I quickly jumped to writing Horror. It's always just been a genre (among others) that's excited my imagination, and, I used to have nasty nightmares as a kid, so I think writing and talking about Horror has been a form of “taking control” for me. Anyway, I wrote one scary story, then another, then another, and then I had many short scary stories, I took some good ones, edited them, and self-published them into a book. My friend helped me edit, and another friend did the cover art, for which I'm very grateful.

When I'm not writing about giant neon hybrid spider/wasps and ancient Cambodian dragons, (look for my next book this October 1st by the way; Paranoia: More Dark Tales from the Mind of G.R. Wilson) I like to ride horses, collect and play war board games, run, and spend time with my bad-ass and supportive girlfriend. A few of my favorite fiction writers include Stephen King, H.P. Lovecraft, Ayn Rand, and Mark Twain.

My official website is www.authorgrwilson.com. You can find all kinds of information, excerpts, and news there. Most importantly: you can sign up for my free twice-a-month newsletter there, in which I give out free scary stories, news on my upcoming projects, and recommendations of other good Horror media I come across. Subscribers will get a special offer regarding my second book, Paranoia, another Horror anthology, which I aim towards an older demographic.

Anyway, thanks for allowing me to introduce myself and my work to you. If you're in the mood for scary stories you can read in a single sitting, and you like variety, please consider checking out the excerpts and reviews of my book. And, sign up for my newsletter: you get a free story just for signing up!

Best regards,

G.R. Wilson

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